SAMOVAR. Second half of the 19th cent. Factory of Vorontsov Brothers. Tula Brass. Ht. 38 cm. State Russian Museum

SAMOVAR. Second half of the 19th cent. Factory of Vorontsov Brothers. Tula Brass. Ht. 38 cm. State Russian Museum

This small samovar, with its happy proportions, elegant outline, and the quiet yellow tone of the metal, is rather attractive than striking. The Vorontsovs owned two large samovar factories at Tula, one belonging to Vorontsov Brothers, and the other, to Vorontsov Heirs. The staff of the factories amounted to about three hundred workmen.

SAMOVAR. Thirties to forties of the 19th cent. Silvered brass. Ht. 57.5 cm. State Russian Museum

SAMOVAR. Thirties to forties of the 19th cent.

In the somewhat affected elegance of its shape and ornamental details (curved handles decorated with rams’ heads, curiously undulating figures of dolphins adorning the tap), this specimen approaches the Eclectic style in applied arts. The high technical level of workmanship places it among the more expensive productions.

SAMOVAR. Forties of the 19th cent. Sergei Lukyanov’s factory. Tula Brass. Ht. 47.8 cm. State Museum of the Ethnography of the Peoples of the RUSSIA

SAMOVAR. Forties of the 19th cent. Sergei Lukyanov's factory. Tula Brass. Ht. 47.8 cm. State Museum of the Ethnography of the Peoples of the RUSSIA

This samovar is remarkable for its shape, which imitates that of a «krater», a vessel used in ancient Greece for mixing wine and water. The form of the «krater» frequently occurs in porcelain, crystal glass and hardstone vases of the period.