SAMOVAR. First half of the 19th cent. Vasili Lomov’s factory. Tula Brass. Ht. 38.5 cm. State Russian Museum

The reputation of the town and government of Tula as the leading centre of samovar production was firmly established in the second half of the 18th century. At first dozens, and later hundreds of factories and shops, both large and small, worked in this area, vying with each other in the technical and artistic perfection…

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SBITENNIK. Second half of the 18th cent. Nizhni-Novgorod Province Copper, patinated reddish-brown. Ht. 32 cm. State Museum of the Ethnography of the Peoples of the Russia

The “sbitennik”, shaped somewhat like a kettle but provided with an internal heat-pipe, was an early form of “self-boiler”, which preceded the samovar. It was used for making and keeping hot the “sbiten”, a most popular Russian drink of mead boiled with sage, St. John’s-wort and spices. This drink was sold by sbiten-vendors right in…

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SAMOVAR. Second half of the 19th cent. Factory of Vorontsov Brothers. Tula Brass. Ht. 38 cm. State Russian Museum

SAMOVAR. Second half of the 19th cent. Factory of Vorontsov Brothers. Tula Brass. Ht. 38 cm. State Russian Museum

This small samovar, with its happy proportions, elegant outline, and the quiet yellow tone of the metal, is rather attractive than striking. The Vorontsovs owned two large samovar factories at Tula, one belonging to Vorontsov Brothers, and the other, to Vorontsov Heirs. The staff of the factories amounted to about three hundred workmen.