vespertilio
Bats /vespertilio/ 10X6.3 cm
Following Isidor /XII.VII.36/ in the bestiary “vespertilio” is derived from “vesper” /evening/. The writer seems a little surprised by the strange creature when he repeats the story by Isidor saying that these “mean creatures” have wings and four legs, and they do not lay eggs but bring forth the living young. They do not fly with the wings but use them for support. They often hang on to each other in a bunch and if the top animal would let go they would all fall down. But the top bird would not fly away out of a feeling of love and affection, which is difficult to find among people. Pseudo-Hugh /III.34/ and Albert the Great /XXIII.I.109/ have chapters on bats.