gallus
Cock /gallus/ medallion 5 cm in diameter
The text follows the story by Isidor /XII.VII.50/ and includes interpolations from St.Ambrose’s “Hexa-meron” /V.24.88/. The cock is named “gallus” after the emasculated priets of Cybele. The crowing of a cock wakes the sleeping, forewarns the anxious, consoles travellers. On hearing the cock the robber leaves his wiles, the morning star wakes up and shines upon the sky, the devoted mind rises to prayer. By testifying devotedly after the cock’s crow, St.Peter washes away the sin of the Church. With the crowing of the cock, hope returns to the sick, faith to the fallen, and Christ turns his face to those who have gone astray. “Aviarium” claims that the wisdom of the bird is comparable to the sagacity of the tutor /36/ and it proceeds from “Moralia in Job” by Gregogy the Great who speaks of the wisdom of the cock /PI. v. LXXVI, col. 529/, Albert the Great /XXIII. 1.51/ and Brunetto Latini /I.V.175/ describe the natural characteristics of the bird. The cock is often depicted in Early Christian art as a symbol of Ressurection and Vigilance. His representation is often to be seen in medieval sculpture illustrating fables on church reliefs.